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Why was krakatoa so loud5 min read

Aug 3, 2022 4 min

Why was krakatoa so loud5 min read

Reading Time: 4 minutes

Krakatoa was so loud because it was one of the most powerful volcanic eruptions in history. The eruption released energy equivalent to 200 megatons of TNT, which is about 13,000 times the energy released by the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima. The sound of the eruption was heard up to 3,000 miles away.

What made the Krakatoa eruption especially loud?

In 1883, the Krakatoa eruption was heard up to 3,000 miles away and is still the loudest eruption in recorded history. What made the Krakatoa eruption so loud?

The Krakatoa eruption was caused by an explosive eruption of a magma chamber that had been partially emptied in a previous eruption. This caused the pressure to the chamber to decrease and the magma to flow more easily. The eruption was also helped along by the fact that the magma was very fizzy. This fizzy magma was the result of the eruption of a previous volcano, Mount Sunda, that had occurred some 400 years earlier. When the magma from Mount Sunda erupted, it mixed with the water on the surface and created a lot of steam. This steam created bubbles in the magma, which made it less dense and easier to flow.

The Krakatoa eruption was also very loud because of the way it exploded. The magma exploded out of the volcano in a series of pyroclastic flows. These flows were made up of hot ash, gas, and rock that shot out of the volcano at speeds of up to 500 miles per hour. This created a lot of noise and made the eruption even louder.

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Overall, the Krakatoa eruption was very loud because of the explosive eruption of the magma, the mix of magma and water, and the pyroclastic flows.

How loud was the Krakatoa eruption?

The Krakatoa eruption, also called the Krakatoa disaster, was a volcanic eruption that took place on August 26, 1883, in Krakatoa, a volcanic island in the Sunda Strait between the islands of Java and Sumatra in Indonesia. The eruption was one of the largest in recorded history, and one of the deadliest natural disasters ever to occur.

The eruption was heard 3,000 miles (4,800 km) away in Perth, Australia, and it was so loud that it was heard as far away as Rodrigues Island, off the coast of Africa, and the island of Mauritius, in the middle of the Indian Ocean. The sound of the eruption was described as "the loudest noise ever heard", and it was heard even over the noise of the thunder and the crashing of the waves.

The eruption destroyed the island of Krakatoa, and it killed over 36,000 people, most of whom were killed by the tsunamis that were caused by the eruption. The eruption also caused a "nuclear winter" that caused widespread crop failures and famine in the region.

Why is 194 dB the loudest sound possible?

194 dB is the loudest sound possible. This is because sound is measured in decibels, and 194 dB is the highest possible decibel level. 194 dB is so loud that it can cause pain and even permanent hearing damage.

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The loudest sound possible is determined by the amplitude of the sound waves. The higher the amplitude, the louder the sound. 194 dB is the highest possible amplitude, so it is the loudest sound possible.

194 dB is also very loud because it is a physical threshold. This means that it is the point at which something changes, such as the air pressure or the vibration of a material. In the case of sound, it is the point at which the human ear can no longer hear the sound.

194 dB is so loud that it can cause pain and even permanent hearing damage. High-intensity noise can cause the ear to vibrate so violently that it damages the tiny hairs inside the ear. Over time, this can lead to permanent hearing loss.

194 dB is the loudest sound possible, but it is also very dangerous. It is important to be aware of the risks associated with exposure to high-intensity noise and to take steps to protect your hearing.

What caused the sounds emitted from Krakatoa?

The sounds emanating from Krakatoa were likely caused by the explosive eruption of the volcano on August 26, 1883. The eruption sent a plume of ash and rock into the sky that reached a height of over 36,000 meters. This plume created a pyroclastic flow – a fast-moving current of hot gas and ash – that traveled down the slopes of the volcano and caused extensive damage. The eruption also created a tsunami that reached a height of over 40 meters and caused extensive damage on the coastlines of Java and Sumatra.

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What is the loudest noise ever on Earth?

What is the loudest noise ever on Earth?

This is a difficult question to answer as there are many variables to consider. For example, what is the definition of "loud"? Is it the loudest sound a human can physically hear, or is it the loudest sound that has ever been recorded?

Some of the loudest sounds that have been recorded are thunderclaps and volcanic eruptions. However, the loudest sound that a human can physically hear is around 120-130 decibels.

There is no definitive answer to this question, but the loudest noise ever on Earth is likely something that has not been recorded yet.

What is the loudest sound in the universe?

The loudest sound in the universe is the Big Bang. This is the sound that is said to have created the universe. It is the sound of all the matter and energy in the universe coming together. This sound is so loud that it can be heard throughout the universe.

What is the loudest noise on earth?

What is the loudest noise on Earth?

The loudest noise on Earth is a sound that can be heard up to 6 miles away. It is the sound of a nuclear explosion.